youth violence

May 11, 2017
We reflect on our embodied experiences of living out the various layers of anti-Black racism in our daily lives. Our starting point is our powerful gut reaction to the experiences of Black youth in a research study exploring youth violence and healing in Canada. We were awed by the intensity of anti-Black racism that youth wrestle with and their creative strategies of healing from its violence. As researchers, we were stunned into reflexive realization that we were inextricably woven into the tangled webs of anti-Black racism even as we were struggling to disentangle ourselves and break free...
March 20, 2017
This report was published by the For Youth Initiative. HERE IS HOW THE AUTHORS DESCRIBE THIS REPORT:This report argues that youth violence is best addressed through a collective action approach, towards achieving these four outcomes: improved employment/economic opportunities, increased educational attainment, a healthy family wellbeing, and social inclusion. Although at present there is important work focused on these four areas, there is no central place that all stakeholders can plan, discuss, share and track city-wide impacts. This report argues that sustainable youth violence reduction...
September 29, 2016
In this article, I tell the story of a community-initiated and youth-led participatory action research project, which was designed and carried out in the Oromo community of Toronto against the disturbing backdrop of youth violence throughout the city. Although the authorial privilege of this article is given to me, this is a project where youth took ownership of the research and turned a community-initiated project into a youth-led initiative. In telling this story, I alternate between the “we” of the project and my individual voice. I discuss the overview of the findings, particularly...
April 20, 2016
The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of youth violence in the City of Toronto through examination of case studies which resulted in sentimental public outrage, and consequentially evoked an institutionalized and systemic response from the government. Examining meta-narratives of various case studies, the process of racialization and its implications and consequences are discussed with particular attention given to critical relationships between race, space, and violence amongst urban environments. The first part of the paper will examine prominent case studies pertaining to youth...
December 03, 2015
Youth violence refers to harmful behaviors that can start early and continue into young adulthood. The young person can be a victim, an offender, or a witness to the violence. Youth violence includes various behaviors. Some violent acts—such as bullying, slapping, or hitting— can cause more emotional harm than physical harm. Others, such as robbery and assault (with or without weapons), can lead to serious injury or even death.
September 18, 2015
This report was published by Assets Coming Together For Youth and For Youth Initiative.  HERE'S HOW THE AUTHORS DESCRIBE THIS REPORT: This report advocates for a collective approach between government, private sector, community/social service agencies and city/faith leaders to effectively address the root causes of youth violence. There are some groups of young people who experience violence more frequently than others; youth coming from socially isolated and financially deprived families are most often impacted by violence. It is also important to note that those who have the highest risk...
May 25, 2015
YouthREX Research Summaries ask Just Six Questions of research publications on key youth issues. These summaries get at what the youth sector needs to know in two pages or less!     1. What was this research about?In the United States, racialized youth are disproportionately affected by violent crime as either perpetrator or victim. Researchers suggest there is a connection between lack of employment opportunities and crime. Therefore, a common response to youth crime has been to provide employment programs for youth. However, these programs are typically offered after the crime has occurred...