youth engagement

May 15, 2017
  by Dr. Kaitlin Schwan  Canadian Observatory on Homelessness, York University     Article originally published on the Homeless Hub Blog and reposted with permission from Dr. Kaitlin Schwan.  For many years, I’ve been powerfully committed to the idea that the arts have the transformative and energetic power to create social change. Even a cursory knowledge of the history of social movements shows us that art is a powerful tool for challenging power structures, mobilizing communities, and re-imagining more just and equitable futures.    I first got a sense of this power as a teenager in...
January 23, 2017
 by Jessica Noble Central Hub Manager, YouthREX        I like to imagine community development as a large puzzle, with multiple layers, perspectives, and players working together to create this masterpiece.   Grassroots youth initiatives are similar to the outer pieces of the puzzle, helping to provide shape and structure. YouthREX is like one of the inner puzzle pieces that provides connective supports that contribute to the ways in which the different pieces connect and for explaining the who, what, why, and how of youth program impacts. Grassroots youth initiatives and co-existing support...
December 05, 2016
  by Maria Gabriela Umana-Peraza  Grade 12 Student, Emery Collegiate Institute  YouthREX Coop Student; and NOISE Youth Fellow Alumnae (2012 – 2013)     A core value that shapes YouthREX’s work with Ontario’s youth sector is a commitment to exploring meaningful ways to engage youth so that youth voice and experiences drive our research and evaluation processes. One of the ways that YouthREX engages youth is through our New Opportunities for Innovative Student Engagement (NOISE) Project – a collaborative innovation space that brings together youth and Social Work students to research community...
April 05, 2016
  by Rebecca HouwerYouthREX Manager of Knowledge Exchange      What’s happening? What happened? What worked? What can I do differently next time to achieve a better outcome? These common, though informal, reflections play in the back of my mind throughout my daily experiences. Whether I ask these in relation to new or ongoing circumstances, I am constantly involved in evaluative work. In principle, in this respect, evaluation is nothing new. Meaning-making is quite ordinary. What is less ordinary is the formalization of evaluative work and its potential to restructure practices and programs...