Perceived influence of African American male mentorship on the academic success of African American males in a predominantly White institution of higher education

Brown, R. W. (2011). Perceived influence of African American male mentorship on the academic success of African American males in a predominantly white institution of higher education: An institutional case study. National Forum of Multicultural Issues Journal, 9(1), 1-13.

HERE'S HOW THE AUTHORS DESCRIBE THIS ARTICLE: 

Mentoring relationships may have an effect on student attrition. Astin (1984) and Tinto (1993) identified several factors that contributed to student attrition, including academic and social integration. According to Tinto, academic and social integration influence students’ decisions to persist in school or to drop out. Tinto found that various built-in characteristics such as family background, K-12 educational achievements, academic abilities, and other personal attributes significantly influenced rates of student persistence. Moreover, integrating students who enter college socially, educationally, and economically disadvantaged into the social fabric of the institution may increase their chances of enhancing persistence and matriculation. Given the problems facing the African American community, “African American boys require communities of men who can ensure their safe passage and celebrate—through ritual and ceremony, fellowship and membership their ascension to manhood” (p. 2). In general, the aim of a mentoring relationship is to develop and refine a young person’s skills, abilities, and understanding (LaVant et al., 1987). Mentoring relationships can be arranged formally or informally. Often, “formal mentoring programs are designed to increase enrollment and retention of minority and other students, as well as increase student satisfaction with the academic experience” (p. 33). 

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